You hear, O LORD

You hear, O LORD

The coming month is a busy one for us. It’s the one time each year when attention shifts to the problems of domestic violence. We use the month to educate the community about what domestic violence is and how to respond, we provide intervention strategies to individuals and organizations, and we take a closer look at the impact Sheltering Wings has on making life safer for women and their families. This is also a good time to remind ourselves that domestic violence knows no boundaries. It crosses barriers of income, race, religion, and age. When you stop and remember than it affects one in every four families, it means that you know people whose lives are being impacted. When you’re in church on Sunday morning or in a Meet Your Teacher night at your children’s school, look around the room. Some of the women you see contend with some form of abuse every single day. What would you do if one of those women asked you for help? Because you know about Sheltering Wings, I hope that you would encourage her to contact us. We are a resource for the community, and we’re ready to make a  difference in troubled lives. That’s true during Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and it’s true all year long! Download the Fall 2013 Newsletter...
We are God’s Fellow Workers

We are God’s Fellow Workers

 “We are God’s fellow workers.” I CORINTHIANS 3:9   You already know that Sheltering Wings is here for women and children… You may not be among the 2,500 women and children who have found a safe haven under our roof, but with one in four people affected by domestic violence, you know or will know) someone who needs help. Our friends and family support groups can help you find the right words and actions. We’ve helped local pastors understand what to do when a church member shares her fear. We’ve helped local employers learn that unexplained absences may be a symptom of a problem that needs assistance. When you give your time and treasure to us, you’re providing safety and hope to women and children, but you’re also giving back to your community. The more everyone understands about domestic violence, the better we’ll all be at eradicating it from our communities. Whether you support us for faith, for justice, for love, or for all those and more, we pray that you are richly rewarded for your selfl ess giving, and for joining with us to offer hope in a world that so desperately wants and needs it. Download the Summer 2013 Newsletter...
The Need is Great

The Need is Great

12,000+ women & children have called in a crisis. The need is great. 41 women & children currently housed at the shelter. Lives are changing. $2,800/day operates the shelted. We need 31 commitments. Download the Spring 2013...
Casualties of domestic homicide: Children

Casualties of domestic homicide: Children

Within two weeks the lives of countless people have been changed. Two women from different backgrounds were murdered by their husbands.  They both had ties to Hendricks County. The common thread for these women is they left behind children.  Not only have they lost their mother, they have also lost their father.  Their lives will never be the same.  They will never have her to help with homework, to teach them to drive, to watch them as they leave on their first date, to shop for their prom dress, see them graduate, attend their wedding, see their first grandchild born… and the list of firsts goes on.   More than this there is another person in the mix.  An often forgotten person in these tragedies is the caregiver to the children left behind.  Not only are they dealing with the death of their daughter, planning the funeral, digesting the fact that their son-in-law is a killer, going to court to obtain custody, possibly finding a larger home to care of these children, and now becoming not only a grandmother, but also a parent.  I cannot imagine the pain, anger, confusion, stress, and burden they now carry.       As shelter staff each time we hear of a domestic violence homicide we are affected.  The first thing we think about is, was she one of ours?  Did she ever seek help with us or our sister shelters?  Did anyone know of the secrets she held within?  Could we have done more?  When it hits close to home, we go into action.  What can we do to provide support to the caregiver?  You...
Dillon Welch Racing

Dillon Welch Racing

Dillon Welch is a race car driver. The Carmel High School senior tries to drive the oval tracks as fast as possible, but he is equally diligent in his efforts off the track to stop a different kind of cycle: The cycle of abuse. “Abuse comes in a variety of forms, including bullying, dating violence, and domestic abuse,” Welch said. “Bullying through social media is also becoming a significant issue with kids.”   Statistics indicate children who experience violence at home often turn the violence outward into society. For young people many times that violence comes in the form of bullying. Bullying can turn into dating violence. Dating violence is a forerunner for domestic abuse. Domestic abuse affects everyone. Children then tend to act out against other children. It is a cycle. Stopping the cycle of abuse will not happen overnight, and it will not happen with the efforts of just one person. Still, Welch believes he can use his racing program as a vehicle to deliver the message. “Because of the sport’s uniqueness, kids tend to find race car drivers interesting,” Welch said. “That gives me a platform to reach them.” In a partnership with Sheltering Wings, the 18-year old racer is developing an awareness program to educate young people on the signs and dangers of abuse. “Our Racing for Wings program will give kids a chance to identify the signs of abuse,” Welch said. “Are they a victim or maybe even the abuser, the bully; regardless, they need help and we want them to know there is help available for them.” Welch, who competes in the USAC National Midget Series, is passionate about his desire to win races. He is equally driven to be a difference-maker in the community. “We will take this message to the students and families locally. It...
Still Standing

Still Standing

Ramona knows a thing or two about adversity. After enduring almost 20 years of physical, verbal, and emotional abuse at the hands of her ex-husband, she had to completely start her life over. Like many other women across the state, Ramona (whose last name is being withheld for her privacy) turned to Sheltering Wings for help. But the decision wasn’t entirely hers. it took a little nudge from her pastor to get the ball rolling. “I never said anything because I figured it was just between us.” Ramona said of her years of silence about the abuse. She said her ex-husband would not only subject her to physical abuse, but would also do other horrific things like sleep with a gun, shut off the electricity when she was spending time with their children, and threaten her. He was even abusive to the children. Eventually she and the children got out. Leaving was no easy task. Her opportunity to escape the situation came mixed with personal sadness. A friend and fellow church member passed away and Ramona, who did not have a driver’s license, needed a ride to the funeral. Her husband offered, but on the day of the service he was under the influence of pills. “I don’t know how many he took, he must have taken a lot because he started acting funny,” Ramona said. When they arrived at her church the police were called and Ramona’s husband was transported to the hospital under detention because he had weapons in his car. He threatened whoever was involved in turning him in. Ramona’s pastor urged her to take the children and leave while he was in the hospital. “At first I was debating because I loved him,” she said. “I didn’t want him to die. I wanted to be there if anything happened.” She knew she had...